Perach Yisroel Community Mikveh

Entrance to Perach Yisroel Community Mikveh
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A Gift To The Jewish Community

Since it’s opening in 2004, the Perach Yisroel Community Mikveh has proudly served all members of the Tucson Jewish Community. Users feel totally comfortable regardless of their Jewish affiliation or non-affiliation.

The mikveh is open throughout the year for married Jewish women and brides. All Jewish women are invited to use the mikveh prior to the High Holidays. The mikveh is open to Jewish grooms year round and for all Jewish men during the High Holiday season.

Our kailim (utensil) mikveh conveniently located in our courtyard is open throughout the year.

The mikveh was named Perach Yisroel, “Flower of Israel”, to honor the memory of the parents of the mikveh’s major donor. His father’s name was Yisroel and his mother’s name was Bluma (which is Yiddish for Flower). The two names combined in Hebrew form Perach Yisroel, “Flower of Israel”.

The interior of the mikveh was designed by Tucson’s ASID award-winning design firm Lori Carroll & Associates. The goal was to create a five-star facility that is pleasurable and appealing, a place that a woman looks forward to using. Everything in the mikveh, from the plumbing fixtures to the towels, had been chosen with the highest quality and beauty in mind.

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The Stained Glass Windows Of The Mikveh

The fourteen internal stained glass windows were designed by the late world renown artist, Ami Shamir. They harmonize with the rest of the facility and also effectively represent the spirituality and tranquility of the mikveh. The number 14 is significant in mikveh observance, symbolizing fertility and family purity. The exclusive stained glass windows represent Women of Valor who have made a major impact on shaping the Jewish people. They are Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah, Miriam, Ruth, Deborah, Chana, Abigail, Esther, Kimchit, Chulda, the Prophetess and Rachel, the wife of Rabbi Akiva. One window represents all the righteous women in whose merit the Jewish people were redeemed from slavery in Egypt. Each of the windows tells a rich story of its own.

The Donor’s Recognition Sculpture

cc2To show recognition of our donors, we wanted to create a beautiful way to honor those who made the building possible and capture the theme of the mikveh itself. This magnificent sculpture, created by local artist Lynn Rae Lowe, incorporates the logo of the mikveh. The oval represents the shape of an egg, which symbolizes fertility. The moon represents the woman’s cycle and the water represents the purifying waters of the mikveh. The stars represent the eternity of the Jewish people and the flowers represent the name of the mikveh, Perach Yisroel, “The Flower of Israel”. The names of the donors and the name of the mikveh are artistically embedded on the stars and the leaves. Additionally, there are 3 special plaques in a beautiful planter that were specifically created to be under the sculpture. Two of them honor the donors of the mikveh windows and the central plaque honors the donor of the magnificent sculpture.

High Holiday Mikveh Usage

For more information about High Holiday Mikveh Usage click here.